Bolt Action ‘48 – Part 6 – Bisset’s Boys

Hello my lovely blogger buddies,

I hope you’re all doing well. It’s day seven of lockdown here for me and I’ve got to be honest and say it’s not my favourite thing in the world. I’m ok but I’m just someone who needs his cup filled to the brim hehe.

I’m really enjoying doing the home schooling with the little one and being around the family more but I need to make sure I’m occupied otherwise I will go a little stir crazy.

I’m an optimist by nature so I keep reminding myself how lucky I am.

One thing I have done is given myself a Mohawk haha. I’m not sure if this is a sign of my descent into madness or a midlife crisis haha.

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I’ve just finished painting another 10 Aussies for my Australian Bolt Action army. This means I’ve painted 30 Aussies in three weeks. That’s not bad is it? I still need to base them but I thought I’d get some photos done while the sun was shining.

This time I tackled the Aussie Militia, known as “Chocos” because, due to their inexperience, some arsehole said they’d simply melt in the face of battle and let me tell you kids, they did the complete opposite when it came to fighting in New Guinea during WW2.

This poem by A. E. Lockrey, who fought in New Guinea, sums it up perfectly.

The ‘Chocolate Soldiers’ of New Guinea

By A. E. Lockrey

The heat and the haze of the jungle
Enshroud them on every side,
The dank and the damp so insistent
They contend with in youthful pride:
Dark terrors are there in the lurking,
In shady concealment they hide,
But the defiant Chocolate Soldiers
Have suffered and bled and died.

Through the trackless mountain passes,
Through the deadly swampland drear,
In the slush of endless mudlands
They plod; and the enemy near
Is crafty, and cunning and silent,
But the Chocos have no fear
As, shedding their blood in the jungle
They fight for their country so dear

And who will dare with sneering
To say they cannot face,
All this, and more if needs be
For the honour of their race?
And how can mind forget it,
And how can time efface,
Such valour must be given
In history’s page a place.

 

My little Squad is named after Lieutenant Thomas Harold (Butch) BISSET. Who died in New Guinea in 1942 after being hit by machine gun fire. He was part of 10 Platoon ‘B’ Company 2/14th Australian Infantry Battalion, so not a Choco, but his story really struck me. Buck was brought back behind the lines on a stretcher and placed down on the track and injected with morphine and he was lucky to have his brother by his side the whole time. The two brothers had always been close growing up in Surrey Hills, not too far from where I live, and held hands as they said goodbye. I found this incredibly moving.

So here they are. Bisset’s Boys, starting with LT. Bisset.

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Not too much to say about them apart from the uniforms are a little lighter (according to the box). I particularly like the chap carrying the Lewis Gun (2nd pic). This weapon had been around since 1911 and was fairly light and mobile and pumped out 500-600 rounds per minute. Nasty!

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I have just received a Matilda Tank in the mail so that’s what will be next for the Aussies.

Thats all for today gang.

Stay safe.

Cheers.

IRO

40 thoughts on “Bolt Action ‘48 – Part 6 – Bisset’s Boys”

      1. Definately keep it then. Grow it long too. I used to use a product called dax wax when I was a riviet head. It allowed me to twist up 4 inch spikes out of my hair- look to see if you can get something similar.

        Gives you something to do in lockdown… how are you finding it?

        Cheers,

        Pete.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Haha that sounds awesome. I think at first I was pissed off being in lockdown because I knew it was down to idiots doing the wrong thing. Since then I’ve calmed down and got myself into a bit of a routine. I really enjoy doing the schooling with the little one. That’s a couple of hours each day and then I’ve been doing a few jobs around the house and then it’s hobby time.

        Liked by 3 people

  1. Very nicely done on the figures and the outdoor photos look fantastic and really set them off. Nice poem too. Now that you are into doing proper grown up metal figures I thought you might like this link – https://www.grippingbeast.co.uk/ANZACS–category–227.html

    Good luck with the lockdown and the home schooling. We had months of it but after a while you adapt and establish a new routine. Should give you plenty of time to grow your hair! 😉

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh wow they’re really nice minis, geez, I’m adding those to the list now haha. Maybe a WW1 diorama. Hahaha cheeky sod “proper grown up metal figures” haha. You should give yourself a Mohawk. I double dare you!!! You have to post a picture too.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I love doing outside photography. The lighting is always great and it’s fun setting up the shots. It reminds me of playing with soldiers in the garden when I was a kid hehe. My wife watches me from the balcony and giggles to herself. She says it’s a funny sight to see such a big man bent over taking photos of tiny little soldiers.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Haha she should get a photo of you doing that some time. It’s always interesting seeing people when they’re engrossed in what they’re working on. I tend to make the face that the character I’m drawing is. Also, even though I have really good eye sight I tend to get right in on whatever I’m drawing so my face is really close to the paper. I’m not sure when or why I started doing that, but it’s something I often catch myself doing. 😛

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Thanks for sharing the story and the poem. Really poignant, and your post is a special way to honor the sacrifice of the brave men we owe so much to – without which our lives may not even exist.

    As for the minis, as TIM wrote, glad to see you working with grown up figures 😁! Of course you wrote this a while ago, but as usual I’m binge reading, and if it wasn’t for your excellent podcasts I’d be caught up already! Anyways, looking forward to the rest of these Aussie posts. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

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